Contacts
WASHINGTON

Sailesh Tiwari
1818 H Street, NW
Washington DC 20433
stiwari@worldbank.org

Maura Leary
1818 H Street, NW
Washington DC 20433
mleary@worldbank.org

The Visualize Inequality dashboard highlights how gender, geography, economic circumstances, ethnicity, and other inherent characteristics affect access to basic services among children. This is known as Inequality of Opportunity; and this tool can help tailor policies and programs to better reach those who are perpetually last in line due to circumstances beyond their control. Read More »


Inequality Stories

Equality of Opportunity - giving Roma children a chance

What if governments made a good start for Roma children a priority? Read More »

Human Development and Inequality of Opportunity: a reply to Wagstaff

A healthy debate on measuring inequality of opportunity in the context of human development indicators. Read More »

Inequality of Opportunity Profiles
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In order to accelerate improvement in shared prosperity (income growth of the bottom 40% of the population), one of the World Bank Group's goals, it is critical to ensure that basic opportunities are expanded to children from less well-off households. Use this tool to compare the opportunity profiles for children in the bottom 40% (ranked by wealth or asset index) of the population in any country to those in the top 20%.

Access to Opportunity: Coverage Maps
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View the broad regional picture of country-level access to various opportunities, including education, sanitation, water, electricity, and health services. Select a period and an opportunity to see how access to basic opportunities varies depending on where you live.

Access to Opportunity: Coverage Gaps
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Go beyond country level averages and see how a child’s characteristics can affect his or her access to basic opportunities. Does access differ between urban and rural areas, for boys and girls, or among children of different socio-economic conditions? In an equal opportunity society, circumstances determined by the lottery of birth should have no bearing on access to opportunities.